Vienna

"I wish I could turn back time."

Name:

Vienna Cole

Bio:

Vienna Cole carries her responsibilities on her broad shoulders with dignity and strength. She’s never walked away from a fight, never shirked her duty to her friends, never seen a problem that couldn’t be resolved through the sheer force of her will…or by a candid smile and a warm embrace.

She’s always been there for her best-friend Cam Stone, just as she’s going to be there now for her new-found boyfriend Sebastian Miro. Vienna would give her life for her family, her kindness steered by the steel of her conviction.

It was easier when Cam and Vienna were living as teenage siblings back in Miami wiling away those hot, idle tropical nights chatting about their favorite topics—fast cars and racing. Until one tragic event left alone…and Vienna suddenly responsible for their future.

Things happened quickly after that: so quickly that Vienna can’t really remember how she and Cam worked their way into those crazy nights racing the neon-streets of Miami. It was inevitable that they’d find an escape into the world of street racing with Suki and her race crew.

She misses those crazy-fun times that all came to a head when a race they’d organized went tragically wrong. As the chaos closed in, Vienna made the impulsive decision to make a run for it…and hopped that flight to Barcelona.

She swore never to race again. And forced a reluctant Cam to promise the same.

Vienna wishes she could turn back the clock—to the days of their childhood when she and Cam were siblings sharing untroubled lives and passions. Her memories, her regrets, her guilt haunt her—while her duty to protect those she loves drives her on.

In Barcelona, she has found a kindred spirit; with Sebastian she can be herself again—alive, trusting, open. She can even see a future, a way to let go of the past.

She tells him, “I know that makes me seem hesitant sometimes, but please know that I’m just looking out for you, that’s all. I just want you to be safe.” But when Sebastian reveals that he’s in trouble, Vienna will be faced with the biggest decision of her life—one that will jeopardize everything she loves in Fast & Furious Crossroads.

Camaro
Yenko

Year:

1969

Color:

Le Mans Blue

In-game type:

Power

Gadget/weapon:

EMP Rocket (Multiplayer)

Quarter mile:

~13.4 s

Remember when Brian, with Roman riding shotgun, launched a Le Mans-blue Chevy Camaro Yenko into crime-boss Verone’s boat in Miami? That Camaro originally belonged to Korpi, a wannabe wheelman who made the mistake of betting for pink slips against Brian in his Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution VII. And while that epic flight into a boat may have saved Monica, the Camaro Yenko was sadly never designed to fly … or swim … and was written-off as lost.

Until now…

Because it’s waiting for you in Fast & Furious Crossroads.

So who and what was a Yenko?

Don Yenko was a former racer and big-time Chevy dealer who, in ’67, decided that GM’s corporate dictum that would allow no Chevy to bear an engine greater than 400 in³ was killing his bottom-line. Watching potential customers—gearheads after some big-block American power—head off to buy non-Chevy muscle, Yenko decided to take matters into his own hands by dropping a Corvette-based 427 in³ into a Camaro and began selling them—with a limited warranty—out of his dealerships.

For ’69, GM—wise to Yanko’s eye-watering sales—reversed policy and began dipping big-block L72 engines into Yenko’s Camaros at the factory using their Corporate Office Production Order—COPO—and a legend was born.

COPO meant the Yenko Camaro not only came with GM’s 5-Year, 50,000-mile warranty, but was tuned-out with factory-disc brakes, spoilers, fatter sway bars, and a host of upgrades and visual touches such as Special Yenko 427 badges, go-faster stripes on the hood, and the sYc badge (emblazoned on the seats). Remember that from Brian and Roman’s Yenko before it went airborne?

They sold 170 or so of these babies in ’69, and nowadays they’re as rare as flying cars.

So try not drop this baby into the drink.

Mustang
"Armadillo"

Year:

1966

Color:

Bulletproof Black

In-game type:

Power

Gadget/weapon:

Harpoon (Single-Player and Multiplayer)

Quarter mile:

~10.6 s

The ’66 Mustang Fastback came with redesigned everything—grille, instrument cluster, wheels, courtesy lights, and an ashtray that was just a little smaller than the bubbling V8 up front. Add to that the unmistakable go-faster racing stripes, exit vents that operated the “silent-flow” interior ventilation system, StereoSonic tape system (with 70-minutes of non-stop tunes!), and the “Mustang 2+2” badge on the front fender, and what you got with the ’66 Mustang was the right side of epic that has now grown-up into a legend.

The Fastback in Fast & Furious Crossroads, though, is not your off-the-shelf 54-year-old Mustang. It features an all modern 3rd Gen Ford 3.5 L DOHC V8 pushing 480 bhp, street-modified suspension, four-wheel disc brakes, and staggered wheel-size, rear to front. But that’s just cosmetic, because under the skin, this Mustang has been built tough.

It features an armor-plated shell made from multiple plates of corrosion-resistant steel, steel alloys, and composite materials that run through its roof, pillars, firewalls, doors, and floor—along with strips of armor to seal all seams. Windows are all bulletproof glass that are made of polycarbonate and specially-treated glass.

To ensure the car remains operative—no matter what is thrown at it—all mechanical components have also been armor-protected including electronics, radiator, and a specially-encased gas tank. Tires are run-flats, and the front bumper is welded, reinforced steel.

It’s tough enough to withstand pretty much anything that’s thrown at it, as you’re about to discover when the bombs start falling from the sky in Fast & Furious Crossroads.

F-150

Year:

2016

Color:

Red

In-game type:

Terrain

Gadget/weapon:

Tow Bar (Single-Player), Magnet (Multiplayer)

Quarter mile:

~11.2 s

Ford’s F-series has been the U.S.’ biggest-selling truck for 40 years in a row and top-selling motor vehicle for the last 35. Ford has sold so many F-series trucks that if you lined them all up metal bumper-to-bumper, they’d circle the world three times over. Do the math, and that’s 26 million trucks sold.

Brian had one back in LA—remember when he turned up at Mia’s with that red ’99 Ford F-150 SVT Lightning courtesy of The Racer’s Edge? The last time you saw that F-150 was when Brian was delivering parts to Dom’s garage to rebuild the glorious ’94 Toyota Supra MK IV. It’s a true-blue working horse of the American frontier, but that’s no reason why it shouldn’t do the job in Barcelona.

Cam’s Ford F-150 is the 2016 spec, and aside from doing what the F-series of trucks does—haul—this one also hauls a bit of ass. Cam and Vienna use it to beat other crews to the scene of breakdowns around Barcelona.

To do that, it’s got a few surprises under the hood—the 365 hp-stock 3.5L V8 has been tuned with a full race-turbo kit along with a direct-injection fuel pump, and it’s now shoving more than 500 hp, making this into a pick-up truck that’s as comfortable carrying parts for Cam and Vienna’s garage as it is hauling to the quarter mile in 11 seconds.

That’s some serious torque from a truck that comes in at around 9,000 lbs (4 metric tons)—450 lbs-ft. of torque propelling the rear wheels. Easy power-sliding fun…and it’s just as well that you’re not paying for your own tires.

RX-3

Year:

1973

Color:

Metal Grey

In-game type:

Lightweight

Gadget/weapon:

Wheel Spikes (Multiplayer)

Quarter mile:

~11.5 s

Back in the day, when street racers got serious out in So Cal, reputations were built and respect earned not by drivers, but by their cars. A driver was known for their ride, and whenever a Mazda RX-3 pulled up in the rays of a thousand high-beams, grizzled street-racers felt cold sweat start to drip.

Getting smoked and burnt by an early-’70s Mazda RX-3—with a fat-tuned engine—has become the stuff of legend, so it’s no surprise to find one of these ultimate sleepers in Vienna’s garage.

Vienna’s 1973 Mazda RX-3 has been widened, trimmed, and lightened to come it at around 1,100 kgs. When you pop the hood, you’re going find a hard-tuned version of Mazda’s most legendary two-rotor motor—the 13B that powered Mazdas for more than 30 years. Vienna’s tuned it to push around 360 hp at the usual crazy-ceiling rotary RPM. Vienna’s also messed about with the carbs and idle screws, so the response under your foot is almost immediate…though the sound isn’t quite as quiet as the old ads suggested.

Mazda was one of the few to ever achieve something productive out of the Wankel rotary engine—the only engine that was conceived in the 20th century. In fact, Mazda’s little engine was seeing action in more than a million cars by the late 1970s. By the late-’80s, street racers, evolving from big-block American muscle to Japanese imports, saw the potential in a finely-tuned, epically-high revving rotary engine, and a legend was born on the streets of So Cal.

Rat Rod

Year:

2018

Color:

Rust-metal brown

In-game type:

Power

Gadget/weapon:

Missiles (Multiplayer)

Quarter mile:

~11.0 s

Don’t be fooled by the look of this rusty 1940s pick-up: under the dents and corrosion of that metal crust hides a precision-crafted 427-cubic-inch twin-turbo V8 powering all four wheels with all the toughness you’ll ever need to conquer the most hostile terrain on Earth.

Inside the cockpit, it’s purpose-crafted for maximum performance: 3-point harness seat belts, a full roll cage, and all the dials needed to keep you going even in the most brutal of environments.

Add purpose-made Rat tyres created for desert conditions along with a heavy-duty tranny, and you have an offroader of serious intent pushing well north of 600 bhp and 600 lb⋅ft of torque—a beast that will take you from anywhere to the middle of nowhere in a hurry.

Just don’t look for any air-con; this is a stripped-down ride for extreme performance in extreme climates.

Dart

Year:

1969

Color:

Lime Green

In-game type:

Power

Gadget/weapon:

Harpoon (Single-Player)

Quarter mile:

~10s

Big-block Dodge Dart models from the late ’60s are the stuff of legend, from an era when the Chrysler Corporation got wise to the whole street- and drag-racing scene and responded by creating some epic power-horses that quickly became the staple for backyard hot-rod tuners.

The core of that legend is the ultra-fat and mythically-orange 440 “Six-Pack” that lies neatly sandwiched between the fender-walls of the Dodge Dart. That engine came standard on the ’69 Dodge Dart GTS and was the last of the Chrysler RB blocks: a 390hp monster whose absurd levels of power and torque would only be tamed by an oil crisis and subsequent emission standards.

Vienna’s ride is built from a base Dodge Dart from ’69, but it takes only one glance at the beefy line to know this is a classic hot-rod powered by a gurgling and heavily-tuned 440-6 Barrel RB 7.2 L V8—pushing out north of 500 hp under that “Six-Pack” hood.

The front fenders have been replaced with fiberglass, and the front scoop has been replaced by a HEMI® Dodge Dart scoop. The doors have been acid-dipped, the bucket seats lifted out of a Dodge van, and everything inside—radio, heaters, even the armrests—has been stripped out to save on weight.

To get it to grip on the street, the front suspension has been completely modified with street-racing control-arms and coilovers, while the rear features a ladder bar. With 15-inch wheels and purpose-fit drag radials at the rear, you’re going to have fun swinging this car around the city streets.

Vienna’s Dodge Dart comes on the scales at less than 1,300 kgs (under 3,000 lbs) and, like the HEMI® Dodge Dart models of lore from ’68, the car comes with an official disclaimer: to be used only for “supervised acceleration trials.”

You’ll obey that instruction, right?

Cam

Sebastian